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Sabbath School

The Daily Bread of the Soul

In 1552, Martin Luther wrote in the preface to his Commentary on Romans:

Boasting in the Cross

Boasting in the Cross

Lesson 14: September 23–29, 2017

LISTEN:

Drs. Carl Cosaert and Paul Dybdahl provide the commentary for this week’s lesson. Listen to the audio file below. 

Lesson14-BoastingInTheCross.mp3

Leading Question:  

Hope for the Hopeless

Isn’t this portion of Scripture the true crux of our spiritual journey as a church family? We have seen, in Galatians 5:16-25, a list of the “acts of a sinful nature,” and there are certainly some major league issues listed there. I am feeling pretty good as we get started into the list. But then we get to “sins” that impact our relationships. Paul seems to be saying to me that “moral failure” is more than adultery or acts of public depravity. He gives even more space to acts and attitudes that make me stop and take inventory.

The Watermelons of Generosity

When I was very small, two or three years old perhaps, my mother would put me in a play pen on the back lawn, under a tree, and give me sweet slices of fresh peach. As I grew up, she always tried to have a ripe white peach from the garden for me on my birthday in early May in southern California. Peaches are still my favorite fruit. And my earliest memory is of sun through leaves, of that sweet moment of anticipation.

Luther on Galatians

Verse 13. For, brethren, ye have been called unto liberty; only use not liberty for an occasion to the flesh, but by love serve one another. 

The Covenants: Two Kinds of Relationships

Many of us read the Bible in linear fashion in which every narrative, piece of poetry, legal text, and other forms of prose merit equal weight to every other, with every text representing God’s ideal will equally. As a result, we have no defining way to resolve texts that conflict with one another. Consequently, we often take sides supporting one set of “key texts” over against another set.

From “Foolish Gentiles” to “My Little Children”

In the first two thirds of the Letter to the Galatians, Paul is engaged in a frank and sometimes angry, rhetorical defense of his apostolic authority and the gospel that he had been proclaiming among the Gentiles. In these sections, Paul argues that he is as much an apostle as Peter and his colleagues in Jerusalem and that his teaching—that Gentiles could become Christians and live accordingly outside the context of the Jewish law—is true and biblically valid.

A New Paradigm for Understanding Galatians

“Let it be known to you therefore, brothers, that through this man forgiveness of sins is proclaimed to you, and by him everyone who believes is freed from everything from which you could not be freed by the law of Moses”(Acts 13:38-9 ESV).

Problematic Approaches

In the Face of Law and Grace: Adventist Views on Salvation and How We Speak About Them

This week’s Adult Bible Study Guide quotes Ellen White: “The law of God, spoken in awful grandeur from Sinai, is the utterance of condemnation to the sinner. It is the province of the law to condemn, but there is in it no power to pardon or to redeem.” (SDA Bible Commentary, VI, 1094). God’s power “to pardon and to forget” is, as the influential Adventist theologian G. D.

Old Testament Faith

Old Testament Faith

Lesson 5: July 22 – 28, 2017.

LISTEN:

Drs. Carl Cosaert, Paul Dybdahl, and Dave Thomas provide the commentary for this week’s lesson. The audio file appears at the end of this article. 

Leading Question:

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