Banner image: Click for Spectrum Magazine subscription page

Warren Trenchard

From “Foolish Gentiles” to “My Little Children”

In the first two thirds of the Letter to the Galatians, Paul is engaged in a frank and sometimes angry, rhetorical defense of his apostolic authority and the gospel that he had been proclaiming among the Gentiles. In these sections, Paul argues that he is as much an apostle as Peter and his colleagues in Jerusalem and that his teaching—that Gentiles could become Christians and live accordingly outside the context of the Jewish law—is true and biblically valid.

Two Women Mean Two Covenants

 

After the interlude of Galatians 4:12-20, Paul leaves the reminiscence of his foundational visit to the Galatian Christians and returns to defending the gospel and the brand of Christianity that he had introduced to them on that visit. The focus this week is on 4:21-31.

From “Foolish Gentiles” to “My Little Children”

In the first two thirds of the Letter to the Galatians, Paul is engaged in a frank and sometimes angry, rhetorical defense of his apostolic authority and the gospel that he had been proclaiming among the Gentiles. In these sections, Paul argues that he is as much an apostle as Peter and his colleagues in Jerusalem and that his teaching—that Gentiles could become Christians and live accordingly outside the context of the Jewish law—is true and biblically valid.

Sidebar image: Click for Urban Mission and Ministry Congress page

Sidebar image: Click for God, Land, and the Flood book

Current Issue

Not yet a subscriber? Subscribe today!

Support Spectrum

Thank you for making your generous gift. Your donation will help independent Adventist journalism expand across the globe.

DONATE NOW!

Newsletter

Ads

Organizations

Connect with Spectrum