Sabbath School

Considering Jesus' Teachings

For this week’s lesson on Jesus’ teachings and the Great Controversy, we have drawn our commentary from a 2008 article by Ernest J.

Bring on the Desert!

Note: This commentary is based on the Seventh-day Adventist Sabbath School Quarterly, First Quarter 2016, Lesson 6: “Victory in the Wilderness.” Please read Matthew 4:1-11; Mark 1:12-13; Luke 4:1-13.

The Stranger in the Gate

Then Haman said to King Xerxes, “There is a certain people dispersed among the peoples in all the provinces of your kingdom who keep themselves separate.

Our Faithlessness, His Faithfulness

It would be better not to read the book of Judges than to read it without reading a big chunk of the rest of the Bible too.  Read by itself, it is not edifying. 

Not Unique to Adventism, But the Heart of Adventist Theology

This quarter’s Sabbath School lesson is on the Great Controversy—that most distinctive of Adventist doctrines. According to the late Herb Douglass, it is the fundamental organizing principle of all Seventh-day Adventist theology, the conceptual keystone of our entire doctrinal edifice. It has also been trumpeted as an original Adventist contribution to Christian theology—the one truly Adventist metanarrative in the whole package of Christian beliefs debated, developed and hammered out over the last two thousand years.

Come Immanuel: God’s Reign of Righteousness

The prophetic quest for “judgment and righteousness” is the quest for fairness and justice upon the earth.  It represents the collective sigh of the oppressed, downtrodden, marginalized and stigmatized.  It echoes throughout history as the voice of the few, brave enough to “do unto others” and to call others to do the same.  It is the essence of hope – the messianic hope - hope that God’s reign of righteousness will finally come upon the earth. 

Why Go to Egypt?

Ishmael and his men, under the order of Baalis the king of the Ammonites (Jer. 40:14), assassinated Gedaliah,who was appointed governor over Judah by Nebuchadnezzar. They also killed the Judeans who were with the governor, and Babylonian soldiers (Jer. 41:2, 3). The narrative’s description of Gedaliah as the son of Ahikam, the son of Shaphan (Jer. 40:9) traces his ancestral root to King Josiah’s scribe, named Shaphan (2 Kgs 22:3, 8, 12). On the other hand, Ishmael’s depiction of his pedigree (Jer. 40:8, 14) suggests that he came from a royal family (Jer. 41:1; 2 Kgs 25:25).

The Covenant

Among the 52 chapters of the prophetic book of Jeremiah the most intriguing concept is the New Covenant. Would we like to know what is a “Covenant” and why is it called “New”? In this lesson we have a list of several covenants: Adamic, Universal, Abrahamic, Sinaitic, Davidic and the New. In addition, we have within the larger context of the Bible, the concept of the Old Covenant and the New Covenant. What is the meaning of the word covenant? While today we do not use the word covenant in our everyday conversation, we use more contemporary words quite often.

The Destruction of Jerusalem

Every few hundred years, there are events that redefine a nation, a people, at its very core.  Consider the shift in internal vision and circumstance that propels, occasionally, a geographical backwater to a leading world force for a season as was Portugal, Holland, and England; or the change in values and identity that transforms a nation as with the French Revolution (“liberté, égalité, fraternité”), the Meiji Restoration of 1870s Japan that opened it to the pursuit of modernization and empire, or the Declaration of Independence that resumed the Athenian experiment with democracy aft

Jeremiah’s Yoke: His and Ours

The official study guide for this week’s lesson uses “yoke” in two different ways. The more concrete usage focuses on Jeremiah’s wearing of a wooden yoke to boldly illustrate his plea to the kingdom of Judah and to the surrounding nations to submit to the yoke of Babylon (Jer. 27).

Facing doubt image

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