Sabbath School

Exploring the New Jerusalem

I barely remember my several years as a teenager being a part of the Youth Sabbath School at the Walla Walla Seventh-day Adventist Church.  But a few things that I do remember include the young and earnest youth leader, the bright fabric on the pews, and how I often used to sit in or near the back every Sabbath that my family attended. 

The Church Militant

Leading Question: How does one know which of the seven churches of Revelation offers the closest match to our own experience?

For this week’s lesson on the seven churches in Revelation, the official study guide states that “we shall study them from the perspective of the original recipients.” Such an approach may leave some readers unsatisfied since Adventists traditionally have used the historicist approach for both Daniel and Revelation. Thus they plot all events on a historical line to the end of time.

Paul and the Rebellion

This week’s Sabbath School study focuses on the apostle Paul’s distinctive contribution to the theme of the Great Controversy. In Paul’s writings this theme, like all other themes, are viewed in the light of the apostle’s main emphasis on Christ and His ultimate victory in providing salvation to the world.

The Great Controversy in the First to Fourth Centuries AD

There can be few episodes in earth’s history more illustrative of the Great Controversy’s working out in human affairs than the repeated bloody persecutions of the early Church. The stories of heroic fortitude and commitment shown by the early Christian martyrs inspired the believers of their own time and literally has inspired (and continues to inspire) Christians for two thousand years.         

Comrades in Arms

We can learn about what mattered most to Christ about His comrades-in-arms by examining the people He revealed Himself to and the contexts of those revelations. Following are descriptions of three of those encounters.

Considering Jesus' Teachings

For this week’s lesson on Jesus’ teachings and the Great Controversy, we have drawn our commentary from a 2008 article by Ernest J.

Bring on the Desert!

Note: This commentary is based on the Seventh-day Adventist Sabbath School Quarterly, First Quarter 2016, Lesson 6: “Victory in the Wilderness.” Please read Matthew 4:1-11; Mark 1:12-13; Luke 4:1-13.

The Stranger in the Gate

Then Haman said to King Xerxes, “There is a certain people dispersed among the peoples in all the provinces of your kingdom who keep themselves separate.

Our Faithlessness, His Faithfulness

It would be better not to read the book of Judges than to read it without reading a big chunk of the rest of the Bible too.  Read by itself, it is not edifying. 

Not Unique to Adventism, But the Heart of Adventist Theology

This quarter’s Sabbath School lesson is on the Great Controversy—that most distinctive of Adventist doctrines. According to the late Herb Douglass, it is the fundamental organizing principle of all Seventh-day Adventist theology, the conceptual keystone of our entire doctrinal edifice. It has also been trumpeted as an original Adventist contribution to Christian theology—the one truly Adventist metanarrative in the whole package of Christian beliefs debated, developed and hammered out over the last two thousand years.

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