Sabbath School

A Permit to Plunder or a Mandate for Stewardship?

Editor's Note: The author's name is Floyd Hayes, not Fred Hayes.

The Defining Relationship

One of life’s biggest questions relates to our origins.  Where did we come from?  Genealogy searches have become increasingly popular in recent years as historical records have become more accessible.

Jesus is More than a Provider

We live in a world today much different than even sixty years ago. The general world view and culture identifies reason with naturalism and faith with feelings—and never the twain should meet! And this great divide is in all churches as in virtually all academic institutions.

Biblical Humility

As I look back on my nearly 20-year teaching career at Pacific Union College, one class stands out as my favorite--Argumentation and Debate. I doubt the students benefited anywhere as much as I did from the experience. Certainly good presentation skills and excellent research were helpful, but the real benefit was, I believe, found elsewhere.

“Why”? or “How”?

Episcopal bishop John Shelby Spong is noted for warning that in fundamentalist organizations, the mere asking of a question may be considered tantamount to heresy. He would know, his positions have resulted in death threats. While not wishing to retain that moniker when my name is considered, I still feel that this Sabbath’s lesson forces me to ask the question, “So why do we keep the Sabbath?”I don’t ask it rhetorically, as I hope to address it in a way that will at least satisfy me.

The Significance of Completion

For me one question, (out of the many that emerge from this week's lesson), especially clamors for an answer, and that question is this--what, (in the context of God's creative activity), is the significance of the idea of completion?  Genesis 2: 1-2 

The Agon of Genesis One

The first hint that the creation of our world takes place within a dangerous universe comes in Chapter One, verses 3-5.  On the first day, God creates ‘light’ and calls it ‘good’; God then ‘separates’ the ‘light from the darkness’ and names the light ‘day’ and the ‘darkness he calls ‘night’.[1]  Curiously, God offers a positive evaluation of ‘light’ without providing any parallel evaluation of the quality of ‘darkness’.  Simply put, although the narrative, at this stage, resists adopting the normative binary opposition of light/dar





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