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Hanz Gutierrez

Protestantism And Contemporary Individualism—Dialoguing with Zygmunt Bauman (1925-2017)

This year the Christian World commemorates the five-hundredth anniversary of the Protestant Reformation, an event that tradition tells us began on October 31, 1517 when Martin Luther posted his ninety-five theses on the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg, Germany. At the center of this movement stands Luther’s rediscovery of the Gospel message: human beings do not earn their salvation by doing good works, but rather God freely offers salvation to all who believe.

Which Ethics? For Which Future? Revisiting Miguel de Cervantes’s “Don Quixote”

American literary critic and Sterling Professor of Humanities at Yale University, Harold Bloom, states that Cervantes’s Don Quixote—the first modern novel—remains the finest. He argues that only Shakespeare comes close to Cervantes' genius and together are the central Western authors, at least since Dante. No writer since has matched them, not Tolstoy, Goethe, Dickens, Proust, or Joyce. Where then does Don Quixote’s genius reside?

Which Ethics? From Which Bible? Revisiting Jose Saramago’s “The Gospel According To Jesus Christ”

Portuguese writer and 1998 Literature Nobel Prize winner, Jose Saramago, wrote a loose interpretation of the life of Jesus. Some of his provocative additions, that intended to fill up biblical blanks and to present a more human Jesus, resulted in the anathema of Portugal's political and catholic leaders. As a consequence, he left his country and went into exile in Spain where he died some years later.

Which Ethics? For Which Church? Revisiting Karen Blixen’s “Babette’s Feast”

The elderly and pious Protestant sisters Martine and Philippa lived in a small village on the remote western coast of Jutland in 19th-century Denmark. Their father was a pastor who founded there a Lutheran congregation he wanted to be as rigorous, disciplined, and essential as the first Reformation communities. For this reason,  he named his daughters in honor of the Reformers Martin Luther and Philipp Melanchthon. With their father now dead and the austere congregation drawing no new converts, the aging sisters preside over a dwindling congregation of white-haired believers.

Which Ethics? For Which Individual? Revisiting Franz Kafka’s “The Metamorphosis”

Gregor Samsa, a salesman, is the main protagonist of this story. After a troubled night of disruptive dreams,  he suddenly wakes up to the sound of rain hitting the window, only to discover that at some time during the night he had been transformed into a large vermin. He is quite calm about his new body and spends some time in bed reflecting on his life and on his relationships.

Which Ethics? For Which World? Revisiting Philip Roth’s “American Pastoral”

Scottish actor and producer Ewan McGregor released, some weeks before Christmas 2016, a streamlined screen adaptation of Philip Roth’s novel, American Pastoral. The movie encapsulates a complex literary masterpiece that was awarded the 1998 Pulitzer Prize for best fiction. McGregor's revisitation puts us, as does the book itself, in front of an old ethical dilemma: the continuity between actions and effects. Can our well-intended actions always produce immediate, direct, and predictable effects?

Toward An Adventist Theology Of Health (8) - The Epidemiological Shift

The unique mixture of Adventist lifestyle characteristics described in last month's column ("Holism, Pro-activity, and Self-esteem") have been recognized, praised, and even raised up as a convincing lifestyle paradigm for non-Adventists. They have been the subject of significant U.S.A.

Toward an Adventist Theology of Health (7) -- An Ecological Lifestyle

The category of Lifestyle presupposes at least six important components: continuity, perspective, proactivity, totality, renewability, and interactivity.

Toward an Adventist Theology of Health (6) on Death

Nothing seems more easy to be defined than death. According to a common technical description, death is the permanent cessation of all vital functions. This short and unequivocal definition has nevertheless the inconvenience of not giving us the true dimension and real meaning of what death implies.

Toward An Adventist Theology Of Health (5) - On Pain

According to the Spanish essayist and philosopher Miguel de Unamuno (The Tragic Sense of Life in Men and Nations, Madrid 1912), pain is the universal human experience of vulnerability and woundedness. It has an objective dimension usually given by the presence of physical damage and a subjective perception conditioned by the religious, cultural and psychological background of the involved person.

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